Preventive measures to be followed to reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism or venous thrombosis associated with long air travel



Europe - The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advised preventive measures to be followed to reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism or venous thrombosis associated with long air travel.

In 2003, a study had revealed that a passenger on long air travel suffer cardio-pulmonary after twelve hours. The risk increases up to four hours and reaches its peak in eight hours. Nearly two billion people fly each year, and new aircraft like the Airbus A 380 flights can provide eighteen hours nonstop.

The most frequent pulmonary embolism occurs when a blood clot mouth pulmonary arterial system, and deep vein thrombosis or "syndrome of economy class, when a clot forms in the veins of the lower limbs and migrates to the pulmonary artery. Moreover, this syndrome is not merely for those traveling in economy class but all classes of aircraft, since it is the stillness that is the cause of this problem.

These cardio-pulmonary injuries are the result of several factors added: Cabin air low in oxygen, prolonged sitting and dehydration. Doctors advise therefore rise steadily, walking through the aisles of the aircraft, such as exercise and drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic drink.

If the recommendations of the ESC are valid for all passengers, they are more for people with a history of cardiac, circulatory or lung. Specialists advise especially for people over 70 years consult their doctor before departure. Low contention can be very useful.

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