Discovery of a new temple of Ancient Egypt


Sinai, Egypt - temples dating from the New Kingdom were discovered in a walled city. The latter is located on the route of Horus who protected the invasion of Egypt. The last temple uncovered is the largest of the four, both religious and military.

The temples were found among the ruins of a fortified city that seems to have been the headquarters of the military during the New Kingdom (1530 - 1075 BC), during the time of conquest. The site lies on the route of Horus, a long road fortified invasions that protected the north-east of Egypt on the Sinai Peninsula. To enter into Egypt, the invaders would have had to go through walls 15 meters thick after the towers to defend 6 floors.

Its foundations show that the surface of 5 600 m² and its columns, it is the largest of the four newly discovered temples. Built during different kingdoms there are 3 000 to 3 500 years, the temples and other ruins in the fortified town called Tell El-Habu, demonstrate the importance of the site. "Every king of the New Empire has built something here," says archaeologist Mohamed Abdel-Maqsoud, the Supreme Council of Egyptian monuments. "This temple is a good example of Egyptian culture" he says.

Archaeologists found about 60 blocks of 2 tons of limestone, burned. For example, on a block of the leg of a temple can be seen Horakhty-Ra (representing the sun god Ra, and the god Horus the falcon-headed) soft key to life in Pharaoh Tuthmosis II, Pharaoh oldest represented on the site (see photo). This mix of representations of kings and gods shows that this site was a religious center, as much as a military base.

"We have not discovered many inscriptions in North Sinai, but now we have opened the door and I am sure we will find other," said Abdel-Maqsoud after 25 years of exploration in the area. All prints will be transferred to the Cairo museum.



Here is an overview of the remarkable ruins dating back to ancient Egypt discovered by archaeologists on the road of Horus among the ruins of four temples.

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